Mystery Skype Experiment

I’ll try making this a quick one.
My classes and I participated in the Microsoft Education Skype-a-thon by doing two “Mystery Skypes”.

Mystery Skype is basically a global “Marco Polo” guessing game.

Two teachers from anywhere in the world connect on the Skype-a-thon website. Each teacher knows where the other is located; their students, however, do not. The teachers then initiate and help moderate a Skype video call. Students on each side ask questions, collaborate in teams, and problem solve to find out where the other class is from by asking a series of yes/no questions.

It was awesome. My students got into it right away. It was really something to see them work together, be engaged, problem solve, speak, and compete, all while connecting with people from other countries (Chile & USA).

The process of getting a classroom hooked up and prepared with the proper technology was a fair task. Accounts, sign-ins, downloads, wires, more accounts, etc. But it was worth it because it was spontaneous, fun, and my students learned. Then something just came to me; the realization that if I didn’t have the technology skills I do as a teacher, I would never have done this. I don’t mean just using apps, but understanding how different hardware works together.

Knowing how to setup and use technology is a skill all teachers need. It’s not about reinventing the wheel or using technology all the time. Having technology knowledge and skills gives you access to a whole different branch of pedagogical opportunities. Don’t let those opportunity pass you by.

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